Mobile Zone is brought to you in partnership with:

Jeremy Foster was educated in computer engineering and mathematics, gathered disparate industry experience in education, aerospace manufacturing, and insurance. With just enough and not nearly enough education and experience, he finally joined Microsoft with the goal of informing and inspiring other software developers to write code and write it right. When he is not working, he is likely spending time with his wife and son, hiking and camping, sailing, scuba diving, or working on house projects. Jeremy is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 14 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Solving Your User's Problem in an Escalator Ride

11.26.2012
| 2646 views |
  • submit to reddit

You want your app to be successful and to be successful, you must think about the user.

Windows 8 thinks about the user through and through. It puts the user in control of what shows up on their start screen, when the app bar and charms bar appear over their content, and what apps have the capability of doing on their machine.

When you're working on your app, consider that the user is not always just launching your app and then closing it when they're done. They may be using your app as one in a series of apps involved in a single usage scenario.

Consider this usage scenario...

Your app helps users make restaurant dinner reservations.

Your user may use your app on its own, but more likely your user…

  • steps onto an escalator at the airport
  • checks their trip management app to find their hotel's location
  • checks for restaurants in the hotel's vicinity
  • picks a restaurant based on user reviews
  • makes a reservation at the restaurant (with your app!)
  • sends the reservation confirmation to a colleague
  • and then steps off the escalator

That user is a delighted user. He has not just used an app. He has accomplished something significant in very little time. All during the escalator ride, the complimentary and informative animations were important, all of the thought that went into the UX of each app was very important, and the app-to-app sharing was crucial.

Keep that in mind as you formulate your app idea, as you design your app, and as you implement the Windows 8 contracts.

Published at DZone with permission of Jeremy Foster, author and DZone MVB. (source)

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)